Rostock 3D Printer build – Part 1

Hello everyone!
My name is Itay, I’m 25 years old and I’m currently studying for my Electrical Engineering Bsc.

It’s time to start a blog to document my project, and to encourage me to do more projects.

The first post will be about an old project, a 3D Printer.
I loved the delta design of a 3D printer, and when I started to this project, the Rostock design looked something simple to start with.
Looking back, I think I had to choose the Kossel design. Back then, I tough that  T-slot will make things more complex, and wood will be easier, but now I kind of regret I didn’t go for the Kossel.

Rostock is a linear delta robot 3D printer prototype, built in 2012 by Johann Rocholl in Seattle, USA.

Rostock page on the RepRap wiki is a good place to start. It has a basic BOM and some instructions.
To start building the Rostock, I needed some 3D printed components that will be the base of the printer.
Those files can be found on Thingiverse: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:17175 ,and the source fies at Johnn’s GitHub: https://github.com/jcrocholl/rostock

Back than, 3D printing was not very common on my area, and I didn’t have friends with 3D printers like today, so I had to order those files online.
After I little research, I found http://www.3distributed.com .
I contacted them by mail, asked some question, and than made my order.
During the build process I had many question and they helped alot!

3D_PRINTED_PARTS

(some of the 3D printed parts)

 Next, I started resourcing other parts based the the BOM that Johann published.
I ordered most of the parts from eBay or Aliexpress. here is my BOM: http://goo.gl/gAz4Qw

For the electronics, I choose the Ramps 1.4  on the Arduino Mega .
This is a reliable and cheap setup, and both Marlin and Repetier support it.

For the hotend, I choose some random Chinese J-Head clone, and it was a huge mistake! This is the hotend that you will find in my BOM.
J-Head hotends are good if you but it from a place like http://hotends.com,
But the price + shipping looks high back then, and I got what I paid for from the Chinese :/
Now i’m using the “MG Plus” HotEnd and I’m happy. I heard good things about the E3D V5 too.

For the motors, the best you can find are the kysan 1124090. I couldn’t put my hands on these motors then, so I got some from eBay.
I think now you can find even better deal on Aliexpress (like this for example)

Steppter motors drivers – I picked some drivers that based on the DRV8825.
The seller I bought from is selling a Polulu clone from Geetech so the price is cheap.
Those drivers are LOUD. I don’t sure if this is because there are clone, or they just a bad drivers, but I don’t like them.
They are doing their job, and I picked them because they can deliver more current, and you can use them up to 1.5A without a heat sink, compared to the commonly used A4988, that at 1A already need a heat sink.
G3D has a good and recommended drivers based on the A4998.

Delta printers has a circular printing area. Finding a circular heated bed was more complex and expensive, so I bought the MK2A. It’s very common and cheap.
Yes, I’m loosing some space, but I can live with that.
If you don’t plan printing with ABS, and you will print only with PLA, then you don’t need a heated bed.
You can print on a glass or a mirror, or maybe some PEI.
More and more people are starting to print on PEI. It’s not that cheap, but I heard many good feedback about it, so I bought one sheet from Amazon a few months ago.
Unfortunately, I have no time those days playing with my printer.
I plan to build a new, bigger, CoreXY based printer some day, and maybe I will use it there.

PSU – I bought some Chinese 12V-20A Regulated PSU, and I have no complains.
The heated bed should take about 10A, and the motors, ramps and hotend should take 6 more Amps, so 20A is good enough.

Timing belts – I used GT2. It’s very common, cheap and easy to resource.

Smooth Rods – I contacted some local distributes, but they didn’t want to sell and cut the lengths I wanted, so I got some from Aliexpress.
In retrospect, I know I didn’t look good enough, because now I know where to buy them from cheap locally.

Bolts, Nuts and bearings – as you can see in the BOM, I used mostly M3 and M4 screws, some M8, and a custom made M8 Hobbed for the extruder.
The bearings I got from ebay are doing the job, but they got rusty and noisy very quick.

I recommend you to buy some extras on those things, I always find my self short on some screws!

I hope I didn’t forget some impotent things.

On the next part I will cover all the parts.

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